Facebook excludes sad moments from ‘Year in Review’ photosets

22 Dec 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Facebook Filters Out Sadness And Adds Editing To Your Year In Review Photoset.

Facebook broke some hearts in 2014 when its algorithmically selected Your Year In Review photosets accidentally included depressing photos of people’s exes, blocked friends and deceased loved ones. This year, the social network has redesigned the feature to look like a photo strip and has made it more customizable to help filter out sad memories.

To avoid the same bad feels, Facebook “applied a unique set of filters” to prevent these people from showing up in this year’s stylized vertical card of 10 photos. The change comes following backlash over the feature last year, after some people criticized the feature for surfacing memories they’d rather not be reminded of, like photos of exes or of friends who had died. This year, Facebook has made the feature fully customizable so users can swap out any of the photos they don’t want to appear with another image that they uploaded or were tagged in.

When activated, Facebook’s tool will provide you with up to 10 photos that it thinks should appear in the year-end piece, arranged in chronological order. A company spokesperson told VentureBeat that the final product is not a video but rather a static card that will feature photos that you can share with friends.

This is different from previous years, which offered more than 10 photos and were separated into chronological sections based on the month they were posted. Facebook tells me it’s using the same filters as its Timehop clone On This Day, so “We won’t show you photos where memorialized accounts or exes are tagged, or photos with people you’ve blocked or added to your On This Day preferences.” However, when editing you can choose any photo you’ve uploaded or been tagged in this year, including one with filtered folks. The nostalgia-inducing feature reminds people how many of their memories are hosted on Facebook, and creates exclusive, compelling content to show in the feed.

Whether it’s painful memories about a breakup, divorce, death of a child, natural or man-made disasters, or whatever else, how people decide to look back at the year shouldn’t always be based on what Facebook’s algorithm says it should be. While ephemerality might encourage off-the-cuff sharing and a sense of urgency when viewing, it also prevents Snapchat from hosting old content people might go back and watch. This and other sad stories are why Facebook fixed the photosets and launched its digital breakup tool that lets people limit posts they see about their exes without having to unfriend them. Unlike previous years, Facebook only shows descriptive text, as it got harsh feedback last year due to an insensitive photo appearing on author Eric Meyer’s News Feed. However, that one has a more global perspective versus today’s announcement, which is all about individual users and celebrating your year, not billions of others worldwide.

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