Facebook’s new ‘Scrapbook’ helps parents keep baby photos in one place

1 Apr 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Facebook Introduces A Scrapbook For Your Child’s Pictures.

Many people like sharing pictures of their children on Facebook, though as the company’s product manager Dan Barak points out, they tend to become scattered across different albums.

When you share a photo of your meal, you’re making a statement: “look at this delicious expensive meal I can afford”, “look at the fancy restaurant we’re visiting”, or “gosh, aren’t I healthy for making this salad?”. A Facebook study showed up to 65% of parents simply tag their partners when uploading a pic of their child, which in turn allows a wider audience of friends to view the pics. It basically lets you tag your children in photos so that you can collect them all in one place, even if your two-year-old doesn’t have her own Facebook account. Facebook’s tells me it’s looking into how it could let parents hand off control of the scrapbook to their kid when they turn 13 and can legally join Facebook. The idea is to make it easier to collect together photos into one place so you can view all of your memories without having to jump from place to place.

It’s not a profile (those under 13 are technically forbidden to have profiles), but the tag will point people toward your kid’s new Scrapbook page. But a few things are certain: The child will need to create his or her own profile — creating a tag for your child isn’t the same as creating a profile.

Barak wanted a better way to compile all the photos of Rom he was uploading on Facebook, so he built one. “Before Rom was even born, I started seeing friends who were parents adding photos of their kids and tagging their partners” Barak tells. For those who have grown tired of the relentless stream of baby photos, Facebook is considering letting users unfollow or block photos tagged with a child’s name in the future. This lets them establish themselves as a parent and create a phantom presence for their kid (which has ad targeting ramifications I’ll get into later). It’s currently a pilot program, so expect more updates to roll out incrementally as Facebook learns just how their users take advantage of the feature.

You’ll then select whether to co-own the scrapbook with your partner, which means they’ll also be able to tag photos of your kid, get notified about those tags, have the photos default to being visible to their friends, and change the Scrapbook’s privacy settings. Years down the road, Barak says Facebook hopes to let teenagers assume ownership of their scrapbook. “Everyone who’s on Facebook should control their own identity”, Barak says. One feature Facebook plans to add is a subscribe button that will let loved ones like grandparents get a notification any time a photo is added to a kid’s scrapbook. A maximum of two people can be the owners of a Scrapbook, and those people have to be in a formal relationship on Facebook (expect “domestic partnerships” for friends who co-own a pet). Divorced parents could always start sepearate Scrapbooks, but there’s some potential for emotional stress even if Barak says “We’re not passing any judgement.” Getting parents to out themselves could be good for Facebook’s business, though Barak says “it was never an incentive.

When I asked if Facebook could use the Scrapbook tags to identify which photos have kids in them so it could hide those photos from people who never look, like, or comment on them, he admitted “It’s something we’ve thought about.”

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