Microsoft To Fight Revenge Porn By Removing It From Bing & Xbox Live

23 Jul 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

How Microsoft is fighting revenge porn.

Microsoft has announced it is joining an effort to curb so-called “revenge porn”, by helping victims remove links to sexually explicit images of them posted without their consent. “When someone shares intimate images of another person online without that person’s consent, the effects can be truly devastating,” said Microsoft chief online safety office Jacqueline Beauchere in a blog post. “Unfortunately, revenge porn is on the rise across the globe. (CBS SF) — Along with a slew of websites and social media platforms, Microsoft is beefing up its policies around “revenge porn” and opting for a new system to help victims report abuse.

Microsoft launched a new reporting page on its website Wednesday where victims of revenge porn can report violations, making it easier for victims to quickly alert the company. On July 22, 2015, Microsoft said it was joining efforts to curb such postings online of intimate recordings, such as photos and videos, without the consent of those in the images. The page is currently available in English “and will be expanded to other languages in the coming weeks”, Beauchere said. “When we remove links or content, we will do so globally.” Google, Twitter, Reddit and others have implemented similar policies. “Clearly, this reporting mechanism is but one small step in a growing and much-needed effort across the public and private sectors to address the problem,” Beauchere said. “It’s important to remember, for example, that removing links in search results to content hosted elsewhere online doesn’t actually remove the content from the internet — victims still need stronger protections across the web and around the world.”

But the company is going even further to erase revenge porn from services that it fully controls; intimate photos of someone shared without consent over OneDrive and Xbox Live will be permanently deleted from those services. Links and content that are deleted will be unavailable worldwide, as these enforcement policies are global and not just limited to a victim’s home country. As Brian Fung writes, “we’re seeing now with Google and Microsoft, some companies are concluding that it’s much better to protect the privacy of their users than to adopt a maximalist view of free speech.” Catherine Garcia

Here you can write a commentary on the recording "Microsoft To Fight Revenge Porn By Removing It From Bing & Xbox Live".

* Required fields
Twitter-news
Our partners
Follow us
Contact us
Our contacts

dima911@gmail.com

ICQ: 423360519

About this site