Samsung Pay launches in the US today—can it challenge Apple and Android?

28 Sep 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

iPhone 6s vs. iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6: Camera Shootout.

That’s a simple answer—spend $1,000 on an unlocked Panasonic CM1, an Android phone that blows the competition out of the water by a very wide margin.

We look for an image to hit 1,800 lines per picture height using a center-weighted score (some lenses drop in resolution close to the edges of the frame), and also take a look to see if edges are problematic—with many point-and-shoot cameras that’s the case. The Galaxy S6 has the highest sensor resolution of the trio—16 megapixels—but if you opt to capture images at a more traditional 4:3 ratio, the resolution is 11.9 megapixels.

The extra resolution is required for 4K video—in the case of the iPhone’s 4K capture mode, the top and bottom of the frame are cut off, as opposed to the S6 which uses its entire sensor to capture 4K footage. Sample variation may play a part in terms of pure image quality, but one thing that’s clear is that the lens on the new iPhone doesn’t resolve quite enough detail to take advantage of its high-resolution sensor. Keep in mind that, because of the strength of our lights in our resolution scene, the iPhones defaulted to a virtual ISO of 250—at lower ISOs the scores would be higher. Noise isn’t an issue with any of the three—they all show between 0.7 and 0.8 percent, which is well below the 1.5 percent that we find troublesome—and all three cameras show a solid amount of detail, more than ample for Web sharing. Operating system bias aside—Android fans will be Android fans and iOS fans will be iOS fans after all—it depends on what type of photography you want your phone to do.

If you’re a serious shutterbug, carry a camera with Wi-Fi—a premium pocket model like the Sony RX100 III will outlast your phone and absolutely murder it in regards to image quality—and use that for social sharing.

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