Twitch stitch-up: Game vid stream biz in hack alert, nukes passwords

25 Mar 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Amazon.com’s Twitch Resets User Passwords After Suspected Hack.

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc.’s video game streaming site Twitch Interactive Inc. is requiring users to reset their passwords following a suspected hack. “There may have been unauthorized access to some Twitch user account information,” the company said Monday on its website. “For your protection, we have expired passwords and stream keys and have disconnected accounts from Twitter and YouTube.” Twitch also advised players to change passwords on other sites that are similar to or the same as that used on the gaming site. Amazon’s Twitch unit said its website for streaming videogame play was likely hacked, though in disclosing the possible compromise the company raised more questions than it answered.

In a brief blog post, Twitch didn’t say how many accounts were affected, nor did it say exactly what data was accessed, referring only to “user account information.” A spokesman for the service declined to comment further. The Amazon-owned company said it’s also a good idea for users to change their passwords at any other site in which they use the same or even a similar password.

Amazon bought Twitch last year for about $1 billion, attracted by the fast-growing numbers of users who watch others play videogames like Minecraft and World of Warcraft and the advertising revenue that comes with it. If applicable, you will also need to re-connect your account to Twitter and YouTube, and re-authenticate through Facebook, once you change your password. Twitch recommended that the best option for password security is to “use a reputable password manager with a random password generator.” For users who are specifically suspected to have had their account details compromised, Twitch has sent emails containing further information about the circumstances of the leak and the affected data. More from WSJ.D: And make sure to visit WSJ.D for all of our news, personal tech coverage, analysis and more, and add our XML feed to your favorite reader. While we store passwords in a cryptographically protected form, we believe it’s possible that your password could have been captured in clear text by malicious code when you logged into our site on March 3rd.

Last week, Twitch went down for several hours, but the company has told us that particular outage was not the result of the attack it is talking about today. A spokesperson specifically referred to it as an “internal tech issue” before the company shared news of the apparently separate security incident.

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